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New Release Tuesday – 10/2/12

01 Oct

Dark Shadows

Barnabas (Johnny Depp) has the world at his feet-or at least the town of Collinsport, Maine. The master of Collinwood Manor, Barnabas is rich, powerful and an inveterate playboy…until he makes the grave mistake of breaking the heart of Angelique Bouchard (Eva Green). A witch, in every sense of the word, Angelique dooms him to a fate worse than death: turning him into a vampire, and then burying him alive. Two centuries later, Barnabas is inadvertently freed from his tomb and emerges into the very changed world of 1972. He returns to Collinwood Manor to find that his once-grand estate has fallen into ruin. The dysfunctional remnants of the Collins family have fared little better, each harboring their own dark secrets. — (C) Warner Bros.

Scott’s Take

I was one of the many bashing Dark Shadows after I saw the trailer.  I was a big fan of the show growing up, so I expected something dark and gothic out of Tim Burton. Instead, we get dark, funny and gothic.  Dark Shadows is not without flaws, but it is a damn fine flick and one that I think people will warm up to much more on Blu-Ray. Yes, I am eating my words and admitting I am a fan of Tim Burton’s Dark Shadows.

Steve’s Take

I didn’t see this and I really don’t have the desire to see it either. There are just times in my life when I really can’t stand to see Johnny Depp in a movie. Sorry.

People Like Us

From DreamWorks Pictures comes People Like Us, a drama/comedy about family, inspired by true events, starring Chris Pine as Sam, a twenty-something, fast-talking salesman, whose latest deal collapses on the day he learns that his father has suddenly died. Against his wishes, Sam is called home, where he must put his father’s estate in order and reconnect with his estranged family. In the course of fulfilling his father’s last wishes, Sam uncovers a startling secret that turns his entire world upside down: He has a 30-year-old sister Frankie whom he never knew about (Elizabeth Banks). As their relationship develops, Sam is forced to rethink everything he thought he knew about his family-and re-examine his own life choices in the process. — (C) Dreamworks

Scott’s Take

The problem with People Like Us is that we already know how it’s going to end.  We have seen this movie before.  Not told in the exact way, but structurally it’s pretty paint by numbers.  Still, Chris Pine and the ever beautiful Elizabeth Banks make People Like Us worth a look-see.

Steve’s Take

I will be seeing this some time soon – if only to see Elizabeth Banks.

Red Lights

Veteran paranormal researchers Dr. Margaret Matheson (Sigourney Weaver) and Tom Buckley (Cillian Murphy) debunk fraudulent claims of ghost whispering, faith healing and other psychic phenomena by detecting what Matheson calls “red lights,” the subtle tricks behind every staged supernatural occurrence. But when the legendary blind psychic Simon Silver (Robert De Niro)comes out of retirement after 30 years, his once-fearless adversary Matheson warns Buckley to back off, fearing reprisal from the powerful Silver. Determined to discredit Silver, Buckley and his star student (Elizabeth Olsen) use every tool at their disposal to uncover the truth behind the charismatic, spoon-bending, mind reader. But Buckley is forced to reexamine his own core beliefs as his quest builds to a mind-blowing conclusion in this taut psychological thriller from award-winning writer and director Rodrigo Cortés. — (C) Official Site

Scott’s Take

I didn’t get a chance to see Red Lights because it was never released within 50 miles of where I live.  It looks interesting and with Halloween right around the corner, who doesn’t want to see a decent supernatural thriller? Here’s an inside tip.  If you want to purchase Red Lights on the cheap, Best Buy has it this Tuesday for $12.99.

Steve’s Take

I’ll take a gander at this one. I’m getting into the whole “horror movie” mood right now. I’m just afraid of how De Niro did in this one.

Cinderella

Cinderella was Walt Disney’s return to feature-length “story” cartoons after eight years of turning out episodic pastiches like Make Mine Music and Three Caballeros. A few understandable liberties are taken with the original Charles Perrault fairy tale (the wicked stepsisters, for example, do not have their eyes pecked out by crows!) Otherwise, the story remains the same: Cinderella, treated as a slavey by her selfish stepfamily, dreams of going to the Prince’s ball. She gets her wish courtesy of her Fairy Godmother, who does the pumpkin-into-coach bit, then delivers the requisite “be home by midnight” warning. Thoroughly enchanting the prince at the ball, our heroine hightails it at midnight, leaving a glass slipper behind. The Disney people do a terrific job building up suspense before the inevitable final romantic clinch. Not as momentous an animated achievement as, say, Snow White or Fantasia, Cinderella is a nonetheless delightful feature, enhanced immeasurably by the introduction of several “funny animal” characters (a Disney tradition that has held fast into the 1990s, as witness Pocahontas), and a host of a sprightly songs, including “Cinderelly,” “A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Makes,” and — best of all — “Bibbidi Bobbidi Boo.” ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

Scott’s Take

You know the drill.  If you have kids or find yourself wandering in to The Disney Store for no good reason, you will be buying this classic.  Next.

Steve’s Take

Are you really going to buy this one if you have a son? I guess it is just worth it because it is Disney on Blu-ray, no?

The Princess Bride

Based on William Goldman’s novel of the same name, The Princess Bride is staged as a book read by grandfather (Peter Falk) to his ill grandson (Fred Savage). Falk’s character assures a romance-weary Savage that the book has much more to deliver than a simpering love story, including but not limited to fencing, fighting, torture, death, true love, giants, and pirates. Indeed, The Princess Bride offers a tongue-in-cheek fairy tale depicting stable boy-turned-pirate Westley’s journey to rescue Buttercup (Robin Wright), his true love, away from the evil prince (Chris Sarandon), whom she had agreed to marry five years after learning of what she had believed to be news of Westley’s death. With help from Prince Humperdinck’s disgruntled former employee Miracle Max (Billy Crystal), swordsman Inigo Montoya (Mandy Patinkin), and a very large man named Fezzik (Andre the Giant), the star-crossed lovers are reunited. ~ Tracie Cooper, Rovi

Scott’s Take

Every single week we have at least one cash grab that has already been released on Blu-Ray.  I already have The Princess Bride.  It’s a great movie.  Why did they release it again?  If you don’t have it, get it.  If you have it move on.

Steve’s Take

I didn’t get it the first time and I probably won’t get it this time either. It certainly isn’t because I didn’t like the movie, but more of the fact that I’m not that big into getting old movies on Blu-ray. Not sure why.

Pet Sematary

A doctor dabbles in magical resurrection with horrific consequences in this supernatural thriller adapted from the novel by Stephen King. When Dr. Louis Creed (Dale Midkiff) and his family move from Chicago to an old farmhouse in rural Maine, their only concern is the busy highway that flanks their new home. Louis’ family — wife Rachel (Denise Crosby), daughter Ellie (Blaze Berdahl), and toddler Gage (Miko Hughes) — soon meet kindly old duffer Jud Crandall (Fred Gwynne), who introduces them all to the local attractions, including a pet cemetary built on the remains of a Native American burial ground. When Rachel and the kids head off to visit Louis’ in-laws, Ellie’s cat gets flattened by a truck. Jud counsels Louis to bury it in the old Indian portion of the cemetary; the next day, it returns from the dead, carrying with it the stink of the earth and a decidedly bad attitude. Shortly thereafter, Louis is tempted to use the cemetary’s magical powers again when his son suffers a tragic accident. A snarling kitty, it turns out, is nothing compared to the horror of a little boy with no soul and a taste for scalpels. In addition to adapting his own novel for the screen, writer King appeared in a brief cameo as the minister presiding over Gage’s funeral. Director Mary Lambert would return with Pet Sematary Two. ~ Brian J. Dillard, Rovi

Scott’s Take

This movie scared the balls out of me.  When I watch older movies that I enjoyed while I was a kid, I often get nervous because I’m terrified that the movie will not hold up.  All this does is wipe away that great memory I had as a child. I’ve seen Pet Sematary a few times over the years and it never gets old.  Gage is a bad ass that makes you want to reconsider having kids.  I will be all over this come Tuesday.

Steve’s Take

I loved this movie and I might make an exception to my “old movie on Blu-ray rule”. Don’t judge me.

Masters of the Universe

Dolph Lundgren stars in this live-action film version of the popular television cartoon series (based on a collection of Mattel action figures). Lundgren is He-Man, a well-muscled super-hero, battling the evil Skeletor (Frank Langella) for control of the universe. Skeletor has designs on conquering the planet Eternia, a ravaged utopia ruled over by the Sorceress of Greyskull Castle (Christina Pickles). He-Man is summoned to stop Skeletor’s plans. But when the wily dwarf Gwildor (Billy Barty) utilizes his Cosmic Key, He-Man and Skeletor finds themselves transported to California. There, a waitress named Julie (Courteney Cox) and her boyfriend Kevin (Robert Duncan Mitchell) come across the Cosmic Key and become embroiled in the intergalactic battle between He-Man and Skeletor. ~ Paul Brenner, Rovi

Scott’s Take

Remember when I told you that re-watching older movies you enjoyed as a kid could ruin your childhood experience?  Here is a prime example.  Loved He-Man growing up.  Saw this a few years ago.. Three words.  Let’s do this in unison.  White. Hot. Garbage.

Steve’s Take

Well, well, well. I must have just tuned Scott out during our podcast, because I listened to it again and I said this was a good movie. Oops! I will now pay attention to everything Scott says. White. Hot. Garbage.

Annie

This family classic is adapted from the Broadway musical, which was based on the comic strip Little Orphan Annie. During the Great Depression in New York City, a plucky red-haired scrapper named Annie (Aileen Quinn) is the voice of hope for her fellow orphans who live under the supervision of drunken floozy Miss Hannigan (Carol Burnett). Annie’s spirit is fueled by the belief that her real parents dropped her off at the orphanage with a half of a locket, promising to return for her with the other half. One day, the dingy orphanage is visited by the sophisticated Grace Farrell (Ann Reinking), personal secretary to conservative politician Oliver Warbucks (Albert Finney). In order to improve his image, Grace brings Annie to the Warbucks estate for a weeklong visit. Annie quickly wins the hearts of servants and politicians alike, eventually even bringing her song of hope, “Tomorrow,” to President Roosevelt in Washington. Warbucks and Grace even go so far as to perform a public search for Annie’s parents, creating an opportunity for Miss Hannigan, Rooster (Tim Curry), and Lily (Bernadette Peters) to scam their way to the reward money. ~ Andrea LeVasseur, Rovi

Scott’s Take

“I’ll slap you like a red-headed stepchild”  Did this come from Annie?  I’m being serious.  Someone help me out on this one.  Annie is a good movie that teaches us all that the sun will come out tomorrow.  Unless you live in Seattle.

Steve’s Take

Classic? Yes. For me? No.

Double Impact

Jean-Claude Van Damme proves that two cracked heads are better than one in Double Impact. Van Damme plays twins Chad and Alex, who were separated at birth when their parents were brutally murdered by members of a Hong Kong criminal cartel. Incredibly both Chad and Alex have grown up to become world-class martial arts experts. Chad is a snobbish Californian karate instructor, while Alex is a cigar-smoking smuggler in Hong Kong. The two are brought back together by the family bodyguard Frank Avery (Geoffrey Lewis) to team up to avenge their parents’ murder. But stacked against them is a thoroughly nasty, over-the-top assassin named Moon (martial arts film great Bolo Yeung). ~ Paul Brenner, Rovi

Scott’s Take

“I would never in my life wear black silk underwear” (Jean-Claude Van Damme voice)  Classic B movie.

Steve’s Take

I don’t like Jean-Claude Van Damme. I’m not apologizing for this one.

Peace, Love, & Misunderstanding

Directed by two‐time Academy Award nominee Bruce Beresford, Peace, Love, & Misunderstanding stars Academy Award winning Jane Fonda, two‐time Academy Award nominated Catherine Keener, international heartthrob Chace Crawford, and Sundance’s “breakout star” Elizabeth Olsen. A comedy about an uptight New York City lawyer who takes her two spirited teenagers to her hippie mother’s farmhouse in the countryside for a family vacation. What was meant to be a weekend getaway quickly turns into a summer adventure of romance, music, family secrets, and self‐discovery. — (C) IFC

Scott’s Take

I thankfully missed this one.  I saw it playing On Demand but decided to skip it seeing as my cable bill is around $300.  That’s what you get when you order these IFC movies that are released on TV before theaters.  Someone still owes me money for V/H/S.

Steve’s Take

I didn’t see this one either. Looks like I dodged a bullet. Whew!

Public Enemies

Based on author Bryan Burrough’s ambitious tome Public Enemies: America’s Greatest Crime Wave and the Birth of the FBI, 1933-43, director Michael Mann’s sprawling historical crime drama follows the efforts of top FBI agent Melvin Purvis (Christian Bale ) in capturing notorious bank robber John Dillinger. A folk hero to the American public thanks to his penchant for robbing the banks that many people believed responsible for the Great Depression, charming bandit Dillinger (Johnny Depp) was virtually unstoppable at the height of his criminal career; no jail could hold him, and his exploits endeared him to the common people while making headlines across the country. J. Edgar Hoover’s (Billy Crudup) FBI was just coming into formation, and what better way for the ambitious lawman to transform his fledgling Bureau of Investigation into a national police force than to capture the gang that always gets away? Determined to bust Dillinger and his crew, which also included sociopathic Baby Face Nelson (Stephen Graham) and Alvin Karpis (Giovanni Ribisi), Hoover christened Dillinger the country’s very first Public Enemy Number One, and unleashed Purvis to take them down by whatever means necessary. But Purvis underestimated Dillinger’s ingenuity as a master criminal, and after embarking on a frantic series of chases and shoot-outs, the dashing agent humbly surmised that he was in over his head. Outwitted and outgunned, Purvis knew that his only hope for busting Dillinger’s gang was to baptize a crew of Western ex-lawmen as official agents, and orchestrate a series of betrayals so cunning that even America’s criminal mastermind wouldn’t know what hit him. Marion Cotillard, Channing Tatum, and Stephen Dorff co-star. ~ Jason Buchanan, Rovi

Scott’s Take

Great Movie.  Bought it on Blu-Ray 2 years ago.  Here is example #2 on how Hollywood doesn’t just want your $$$.  They want your soul!

Steve’s Take

I wanted to see this in the theaters, but missed it. Then I wanted to get it on Blu-ray, but missed it. I’ve attached the older version to this article so you can save a few bucks. I know I will.

Goldeneye

GoldenEye (James Bond) [Blu-ray]

Pierce Brosnan made his first appearance as James Bond in this action thriller, the 17th in the series (excluding the 1967 Casino Royale and the 1983 Never Say Never Again) featuring the suave British super-agent. As the story begins, Agent 007 and his partner, Agent 006 (Sean Bean), pull a daring raid on a chemical weapons plant in the Soviet Union; however, they are captured by Russian troops, and while Bond is able to escape, 006 is not so lucky. Several years later, the Soviet Union and the Cold War are a thing of the past, but Bond is still at work ferreting out evildoers everywhere. Xenia Onatopp (Famke Janssen), a beautiful but vicious villain working with the Russian Mafia, spearheads the theft of the controls to GoldenEye, a high-tech satellite weapons system, and with her gunmen, she kills most of the soldiers and guards at a top-secret military facility in the process. Bond joins forces with Natalya Simonova (Izabella Scorupco), one of the base’s few survivors, to help track down Onatopp’s minions and the controls to GoldenEye, which can destroy all electronic circuits in a given area in a matter of seconds; however, in time, Bond discovers the true identity of the criminal mastermind who is behind this bid for unholy power and world domination — none other than Alec Trevelyan, the man Bond once knew as 006. In addition to Brosnan, GoldenEye also marked another significant cast change for the Bond series — Judi Dench made her debut as M, Bond’s superior. Minnie Driver also has a cameo as a nightclub singer. Sadly, this was the last film in the Bond series for special-effects supervisor Derek Meddings, who died in the midst of production; the film was dedicated to him. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi

Scott’s Take

While I enjoyed Pierce Brosnan as James Bond while watching him.  Seeing Daniel Craig as the new Bond has made me realize how incredibly cheap and ridiculous the Brosnan Bond era was.  I have no desire to sit through Goldeneye ever again.  I shall wait for Skyfall.

Steve’s Take

I agree with everything that Scott said. I love Daniel Craig as Bond. Book it. I don’t know why I said book it or what it really means as it pertains to movies, but just do it.

Tomorrow Never Dies

Tomorrow Never Dies (James Bond) [Blu-ray]

Roger Spottiswoode (Air America) directed this film, the 18th chapter in the 35-year-old James Bond series (excluding Casino Royale and Never Say Never Again). James Bond (Pierce Brosnan) learns billionaire media mogul Elliot Carver (Jonathan Pryce) is manipulating world events via an exclusive flow of information through his satellite system reaching all corners of the planet. With a stealth battleship sinking a British naval vessel, Carver sees that the Chinese are blamed. Crashing Carver’s party in Hamburg, Bond meets “journalist” Wai Lin (Michelle Yeoh), later revealed as a Chinese agent. In a brief tryst, Bond renews his past relationship with Carver’s wife Paris (Teri Hatcher). Carver dispatches Stamper (Gotz Otto) and other goons to cancel Bond, who eludes attackers with some of his new gadgets. In Southeast Asia, after Bond and Wai Lin scuba dive into the sunken British ship, they are captured by Stamper, handcuffed, and taken to Saigon where they make a motorcycle escape. To thwart Carver’s plans for WWIII, the two agents head for Carver’s stealth ship where a cruise missile is aimed at Beijing. Principal photography began April 1, 1997 in the new Eon Productions studio facility at Frogmore, northwest of London, and on the 007 stage at Pinewood Studios. Locations included the UK, Hamburg, Southeast Asia, Mexico, and off the Florida coast. The trademark Bond pre-title sequence was filmed in the French Pyrenees snowfields, centered around one of the few high-altitude operational airfields in Europe. ~ Bhob Stewart, Rovi

Scott’s Take

See Goldeneye.

Steve’s Take

There Amazon goes again – placing an eye-sore on my website. Damn you.

Next Week

That’s all for this week.  Next week we have Prometheus, E.T., Rock of Ages, Little Shop of Horrors, Strangers on a Train, The Raven, Constantine and much more.  Have a great week everyone.

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